What's New in the Library - Winter 2011

Suicide
by Hal Marcovitz. Abdo Publishing (2011). 112p., ill.



A general introduction and primer for young people on some of the issues relating to suicide. Topics include: risk factors, history of suicide, mental disorders and suicide, the right to die, suicide prevention and others.
Recommended for young adults.

History of a suicide: my sister’s unfinished life
by Jill Bialosky. Atria Books. (2011). 252p.

 


Author’s memoir of sister’s suicide. A moving tale of particular interest to those who have lost siblings of other loved ones to suicide.
Recommended for adults.


Latinas attempting suicide:when cultures, families and
daughters collide

by Luis H.Zayas. Oxford University Press. (2011). 217p.


Examines suicide trends currently experienced by women in the American Hispanic community. Recommended for academics.


Promoting men’s mental health
eds. by David Conrad and Alan White. Radcliffe Publishing. (2011). 266p.




An anthology of scholars exploring topics in male mental health ranging from urban distress to military stress to gay issues and beyond. Of particular interest are the sections on men and suicide.
Recommended for academics but will appeal to a general readership as well.

Gays and mental health: fighting depression, saying no to suicide 
by Jamie A. Seba. Mason Crest Publishers. (2011). 64p.,ill.





Short but informative book addressing important issues for LGBT teens including the importance of gay role models, depression and suicide, self-esteem, getting help, etc.
Recommend for young adults.



Suicide Movies: social patterns 1900-2009
by Steven Stack and Barbara Bowman. Hogrefe Publishing. (2012). 298p. ill.




Fascinating and exhaustive analysis of suicide depicted in the hundred plus years of cinema.
Recommended for academics and adults.

Lonely at the top: the high cost of men’s success by
Thomas Joiner. Palgrave Macmillan. (2011). 266p.



Much anticipated book by noted author in the field of suicidology, Thomas Joiner. His previous book, Myths about suicide was excellent. This study tries to uncover some of the myriad reasons that men continue to be the most at-risk group of suicides. Some interesting ideas, especially that the male quest for material and professional success through their working years can cost them supportive friendships as they age, making them even more susceptible to depression and suicide. Fascinating reading. 
Recommended for adults, professionals and academics.

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